Leonardo's Apprentice

EduTech

computersComputers, laptops and iPads have become as common as the number 2 pencil. .  The research shows that 75% of today’s schools are using computers as part of the curriculum.  However, the very companies and institutions that have created and promoted technology (i.e., Apple, Microsoft) have funded the vast majority of the studies available, raising questions to the validity and objectivity in the research (Educational Week, Dec. 30, 2012).

For example, the iPad was introduced in April 3, 2010.  In that year, a number of stories emerged on student achievement and success in the classroom (Crump, M., Mar 29, 2010).   Since the release of the first iPad, we have seen the development and release of several generations of Kindle, Nook, ACER, and Microsoft e-tablet products.  Included with each of these technology releases has included the promise of student achievement, creativity and promotion under the NCLB program.

However, the purpose of this dialog is not to discuss the type of technology that is being put into the hands of our students, nor is to bash technology.  But to ask a simple question in how is technology in schools being assessed?

Grant you; the majority of students in the United States have access to technology at school, home or even their local public library.  While in school students generally use technology as a word processor and information gathering source (Royer, 2002).  Many research studies on the efficacy of technology tools for teaching and learning, studies are not supporting a strong conclusion that the return on investment is showing any future promises for success.

I found one article called, “How To Know If You’re Correctly Integrating Technology,”  that I believe to be on the right track of assessing the integration of technology into the curriculum.  A copy of the matrix is found below.

Matrix

References

CEO Forum. (2000). The power of digital learning: Integrating digital content. The CEO Forum school technology and readiness report, year three . Washington, DC: CEO Forum on Education and Technology.

Crump, M. (2010). Pros and Cons of the iPad in Education. GIGAOM.  Retrieved from

http://gigaom.com/apple/pros-cons-ipad-education/

Royer, R. (2002). Supporting technology integration through action research.

The Clearing House , 75(5), 233-237.


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